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Resources for Education During a Pandemic

Published on Sun, 09/11/2022

We are approaching the third winter of education during a pandemic, now with the benefit of experience, vaccines, and the expectation that any school closures will be brief and that in-person learning will remain the norm. Still, the impact of COVID-19 as a teaching challenge that has propelled educators to develop a wide range of digital learning skills and strategies to meet learners where they are, maintains the relevance of the social studies resources that have been collected here.

Whose stories? Consider immigrant history

Published on Tue, 05/31/2022

Whose stories would your students like to learn about in your curriculum? Give them this anonymous survey to find out!

Topics that students care about can be one of the most powerful incentives to engage in class, and even, when it is in the balance, to come to school. As we bring the year to a close, finding ways to look ahead with excitement is part of the prescription for all of us.

Guest Blog Post: Defining Civic Equity for Students with Disabilities

Published on Fri, 03/04/2022

Updated 07-15-2022

By Leah Bueso

Civic Engagement Research Group, University of California, Riverside

 

“Disability is a natural part of the human experience and in no way diminishes the right of individuals to participate in or contribute to society.”

- Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 

Wendy Harris lesson on "How Activists Create Change" for Black History Month

Published on Wed, 02/02/2022

Wendy Harris teaches at Metro Deaf School in St. Paul, Minnesota. She has been a classroom teacher for Deaf students of all ages since 2003 and currently splits her teaching duties between high school social studies and teaching braille and other skills to the school’s DeafBlind students ages 2-21.

English Learner Collaborations project to Teach the Language of Social Studies

Published on Mon, 10/04/2021

In a 10th grade classroom, a newly arrived student from Sudan, a returning student from a migrant worker family, and a student whose family came from Cambodia in the 1970s are among the 25 students in a US History class. These three students have been silent in all previous class discussions.
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