Translate

English Dutch French German Italian Portuguese Russian Spanish

Search

Resources for Teaching about Genocide

Published on Mon, 02/07/2022

Updated 04-06-2022

In December 2021, Massachusetts became the 20th state to pass legislation requiring that every student learn about genocide. (See the Massachusetts law.) The law pointedly requires that students learn about human rights and genocides across history. In this Month’s post, we offer a selection of resources to help address this imperative. 

History eNews from Emerging America - March 4, 2020

Published on Wed, 03/04/2020

NEWS Transforming Education for Social Justice Conference - 3/14 - UMass Amherst. Register ASAP. INFO. Donate to youth scholarships: collaborative.org/transforminged-giving.  DESE seeks teachers for voluntary, computer-based question tryout in May/June 2020 for new MCAS History and Social Science test in grade 8 civics. Sign up by March 13.  iCivics Celebration of Civics - May 21 - spotlight Massachusetts civics projects. Info.  Submit workshop proposals by Friday, March 13 for DESE’s 2020 Civics Literacy Conference on May 5, 2020 9:15 a.m.-4:00 p.m.  Teaching about Ideology and Other Difficult Topics? Sign up for America and World Fascism: From the Spanish Civil War to Nuremberg and Beyond - Register for April 3-4 workshop in Melrose, Mass.

Using Visual Primary Sources

Published on Tue, 10/01/2019

Visual Literacy: Making Lessons Accessible and Inclusive

Guest Blog Post by Wendy Harris, High School Social Studies & Teacher of the Blind at Metro Deaf School in St. Paul, Minnesota.  

You want to get your students to work with primary sources, but you have students who struggle with reading English text. Maybe they have a learning disability, English is not their most comfortable language, or any number of other reasons. Sound familiar?

Propaganda Posters of the Spanish Civil War

Emerging America, in a partnership with the Abraham Lincoln Brigade Archives, has a produced a primary source-filled lesson on the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) – arguably the start of World War II. In this complex conflict, all sides used propaganda to sway the opinions of Spanish citizens and nations around the globe. The most apparent form of propaganda used was posters created by each side of the war. The Library of Congress has over 120 colorfully detailed posters. Students will use these posters to discuss and evaluate the tools of persuasion.

Monuments in Washington D.C.

The following 5 day unit plan uses primary source images of the National Mall and a modern tourist primary source map to observe, reflect, and explain some the varied historical sites available to students, educators, and travelers alike. In particular, students will explore three of the following sites:

New Primary Source Set! Eugenics: Preoccupation with Genetic Fitness and Threats of Difference & Disability

Published on Fri, 02/08/2019

The Eugenics movement in the early 20th century United States, a pseudo-scientific amalgamation of social Darwinist philosophy and animal breeding management, gained widespread approval across the country and influenced many internationally, most notably in the the Nazi racial policies of the era leading up to World War II. This primary source set includes newspaper articles, photographs, cartoons, notes on legal cases, a video interview with a man sterilized without consent when he was a boy, a radio report on non-conse

New Accessible Lesson Plan: Who Should Care for America’s Veterans?

Published on Sun, 05/06/2018

Care for veterans is a topic not only relevant to the understanding of the aftermath of war, and to the understanding of the role of government, but is a critical topic within the longer arc of disability history. In this lesson, students gather information through a variety of primary sources on the experiences of veterans from the War of Independence through today, and ask the question, ‘How has U.S.

Subscribe to World War II