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Guest Blog Post: Defining Civic Equity for Students with Disabilities

Published on Fri, 03/04/2022

By Leah Bueso

Civic Engagement Research Group, University of California, Riverside

 

“Disability is a natural part of the human experience and in no way diminishes the right of individuals to participate in or contribute to society.”

- Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 

Wendy Harris lesson on "How Activists Create Change" for Black History Month

Published on Wed, 02/02/2022

Wendy Harris teaches at Metro Deaf School in St. Paul, Minnesota. She has been a classroom teacher for Deaf students of all ages since 2003 and currently splits her teaching duties between high school social studies and teaching braille and other skills to the school’s DeafBlind students ages 2-21.

English Learner Collaborations project to Teach the Language of Social Studies

Published on Mon, 10/04/2021

In a 10th grade classroom, a newly arrived student from Sudan, a returning student from a migrant worker family, and a student whose family came from Cambodia in the 1970s are among the 25 students in a US History class. These three students have been silent in all previous class discussions.

Closing the Gap in Civics for Students with Disabilities in Classrooms from K-12

Published on Wed, 09/08/2021

Mind the Gap

Students gain knowledge and skills in civics and history when schools provide effective instruction and when students have opportunities to express their voice and to engage in activities like service-learning. Yet American education is falling far short–in elementary grades in particular–and especially for students with disabilities. 

What is our value? A look at undervalued people

What is our value? The principle that people are paid for their work does not always work as it should; many people who have been historically undervalued have contributed to American society, including many people of color, people with a disability, women, and children. Students view images and text of people whose lives may not have been adequately valued by their contemporaries. Students examine those documents, do further research, and come to their own conclusions about how those individuals should have been and should be valued, and possibly assisted.

History's Mysteries K-5 Curriculum now available!

Published on Fri, 07/17/2020

History's Mysteries K-5 Curriculum 

The kids loved this! They were very interested in the slideshow the entire time. The narration made it seem like a movie. They asked a lot of thoughtful questions and had lots of good discussions. I liked that we had the flexibility to make it last as long or as short as they could handle. - First Grade Teacher

History eNews from Emerging America - March 25

Published on Wed, 03/25/2020

MORE RESOURCES FOR TEACHING ONLINE - links below.  WEBINAR - April 29 - 3:30-4:45pm EST - Accessing Civic Engagement with Students with Disabilities. POSTPONED - Massachusetts Civic Literacy Conference scheduled for May 5 - postponed to early fall.  Teaching Tolerance - Speaking Up Against Racism Around the New Coronavirus
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