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Industrial Revolution and Its Impact at Home and Abroad

The Industrial Revolution sparked remarkable and permanent changes in the United States. The tremendous increase in the availability and variety of manufactured goods combined with the massive need for factories and workers to revolutionize American society generated a profound impact on American society. The following set offers a rich range of primary sources, exploring these changes and the extent of their impacts on workers, homes, communities, and the environment.

Cold War Era

The following primary source set explores documents depicting life and events during the Cold War Era. A few topics, such as Civil Rights, have been organized by the Library of Congress to readily offer many primary sources online. Sections below will reference those resources. The CES primary source set draws upon diverse collections to offer a few high quality illustrations for discussion and to prompt inquiry. 

The Immigration Experience Flow Map

The following immigration flow map is a valuable resource both to further understanding of the progression of the immigration experience and as an example of a flow map for virtually any topic or lesson plan. Tracing the origins of the immigrant decision to leave their homes through their settlement into a new environment, this flow map provides visual clarification through primary source materials from the Library of Congress. In addition, educators may use the flow map as an example of how to produce a flow map and how to incorporate primary source documents into sequential order.

Deformity and Disability in Ancient Greece

This lesson focuses on the study of deformities and disabilities in ancient Greece in relation to their societal norms. Students will compare the images of two Greek gods, Zeus and Hephaestus. They will read excerpts from three ancient Greek philosophers; Plato, Aristotle and Plutarch regarding people with disabilities as well as the myth explaining the birth of Hephaestus on Mount Olympus. Students will be able to analyze a variety of ancient sources to draw conclusions about society’s view of people with disabilities in ancient Greece.

Immigration: The Making of America

The following unit plan highlights how patterns of immigration are both similar and different for immigrant groups coming to America. The cornerstone of the unit is a diagram and PowerPoint Presentation detailing the progression of the immigrant experience that serves as a model for a variety of immigrant groups. Included in the set is a Universal Design for Learning chart and an extensive annotated list of primary source documents from the Library of Congress provide a visual reinforcement of the immigrant journey both before, during, and after their arrival in the United States.

Civic Engagement Through Service Learning – Project Guidelines

Goals for a community-based history project. This resource consists of slides created for the Windows on History (which focused on a project culminating in building a website), a graduate course for teachers, supported by the Library of Congress TPS Program at CES. Find more resources on how to organize local history civic engagement and service-learning projects at http://emergingamerica.orgprograms/windows-on-history/.

World War I and Disability

The lesson invites students to think about what life was like as a disabled veteran of WWI and to connect to background knowledge as well as personal experiences. The teacher will provide historical information and guide the class in a read-aloud from the perspective of a soldier wounded and recuperating in Italy from Ernest Hemingway’s “In Another Country.”

The Magna Carta: Due Process from King John to the 14th Amendment and Beyond

What impact did the Magna Carta have on the U.S. Constitution and the shaping of the 14th Amendment? In the following lesson plan students will trace both the origins and results of the Magna Carta in the context of the U.S. Constitution and the 14th Amendment. With a particular emphasis placed on the due process of law, students will analyze and organize primary source documents ranging from a British Court of Common Pleas from 1610 to Chief Justice Warren’s notes on Miranda v. Arizona in 1966.

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